Welcome to the Permaculture Association Blog

You can find a wealth of news and knowledge that follows the work of members and partners.

The new Gardens of Sanctuary project was presented to the Oxford Real Farming Conference this week by Ben Margolis from The Grange and Sophie Antonelli from the Federation of City Farms and Community Gardens.

Ben and Sophie are working with City of Sanctuary and the Permaculture Association to support growing spaces around the UK to become places of welcome and sanctuary for refugees and asylum seekers.

Tree dressing
Over the past few months, Permaculture Ambassadors have held local gatherings across the country. We hear from two in this blog at the extremes of England - one in North East England and the other the South East. If reading about these inspires you to organise your own local gathering, then visit the Ambassadors webpage to find out more about how to apply for funding for Spring/Summer 2018.

We have two reviews of The Minimalist Gardener, by Patrick Whitefield. We think both offer valuable insights and reflections so have published them both together! You can buy the Minimalist Gardener at a special price direct from the publisher.

The Minimalist Gardener brings together a series of 17 articles written by renowned grower, permaculturist and teacher, the late Patrick Whitefield and originally published in Permaculture Magazine over a period of more than twenty years. Big thanks are due to Permanent Publications for bringing these articles together into this very accessible and easy reading new reference book.

The Oxford Real Farming Conference (ORFC) in January will be a valuable opportunity to develop understanding and collectively plan. Now in its eighth year, it has become an event that gets highlighted on our calendar early in the year. ORFC delegates are those from across food and farming, with an interest in new agricultural models. They represent those who are interested in meeting global food system challenges in original, environmentally sustainable ways. The point of the ORFC is not simply to attack the status quo but to look ahead — to ask what the world really needs, and what really can be done.

Given our love of conversation about the weather, we're never happier than when there's a big storm brewing on the Atlantic and pushing our way. Now that we've taken on the North American convention of naming our storms after innocent bystanders (rather than climate deniers), we can begin to pinpoint exactly who is to blame as we bandy about our latest climate dramas. It's a bit like a game of Cluedo: “I accuse Ophelia in the hay barn with the broken roof tile!”

If we want to create sustainable, healthy systems to support us, we cannot rely on such a fickle friend as fossil energy for electricity generation to keep our sewage treatment systems running smoothly.