Welcome to the Permaculture Association Blog

You can find a wealth of news and knowledge that follows the work of members and partners.

Graham Bell reflects on the huge impact Permaculture Design Courses have had on participant's lives and their journeys of 'unlearning' and 'learning'. After thirty years of engagement with Permaculture it never ceases to amaze me how the Permaculture Design Course (PDC) changes peoples’ lives. This brilliant understanding of how to meet peoples’ needs, without working so hard, and at the same time learning to minimise waste was crafted by Bill Mollison and David Holmgren before I came along to connect with it. I’m also hugely aware that it has always been a fantastic effort of trawling wisdom from all across the planet contributed by unknown numbers of people.

The world of permaculture is complex, diverse, colourful, dynamic and creative. The backdrop to this amazing movement is equally polycultural: cityscapes and farms, wild places and housing estates, icy northern climates and humid equatorial zones.

The characters in our movement’s stories encompass all ethnicities, all species, all kingdoms whether they be animal, plant, fungi or bacteria...

Together we comprise millions of individuals working together to design and create harmonious habitats where humans and our natural companions can thrive together.

The Permaculture Association’s key roles are to educate and to connect people and what better way to do that than through beautiful images celebrating your lives, your work, your projects and your communities.

As many of you know, permaculture will often have you disappear down a rabbit hole, if not an entire warren. Or, in permaculture-speak, will take you off the well-beaten track to explore those infamous edges.

The Hornshurst Forest Garden is one such edge. It is an acre site, deer and rabbit fenced, within a much larger 160 acre wood. I have been designing it for the wood owner, Doro Marden, for about 3 years.

Trying to grow fruit trees on a newly cut pine plantation (a.k.a - an ecological desert) was never going to be easy and we certainly have had challenges to overcome. I now have some things to report of interest.

I believe anyone can do absolutely anything.

I believe life is an art and a complex system, and that we must live our lives as if each day were a work of art. As if there are universes in every single thing we see, touch, hear. As if there are magic moments to be found in every mundane thing and inconsequential interaction. I believe creating resonance is the most beautiful measure of our interconnectedness.

I grew up in one of the poorest villages of one of the poorest states in India. We had no electricity for water. More recently, I lived for two years with snakes, jaguars, spiders, and monkeys while volunteering in the Amazon and Andes of South America. These experiences brought a visceral perspective to my work.

There is a piece of paradise disguised as a campsite in Southern Hungary called Hunza Ecolodge. It is located between lush green hills, in the heart of Baranya county near a town called Pécs with a rich cultural life.